Archive for the ‘Chapter 23’ Category

Chapter 23 questions- These are due December 11, 2013

Always be specific in your answer and include dates as well!

1. What were the two parties’ differing views of  Reconstruction, and how did that influence their choices in the election of 1868? What does “waving the bloody shirt” and “the bloody chasm”mean?

2. What was the “Ohio Idea” and how would have affected the economy? Why do debtors like inflation?

3. Why were Republicans especially indebted to the 15th Amendment for their victory in 1868?

4. What were the practical effects of the Fisk/Gould conspiracy and of the Tweed Ring scandal?

5. What does “graft” and “honest graft” mean? Who eventually brought down Tweed?

6. Describe the Credit Mobilier, Belknap and Whiskey Ring scandals. What does this indicate about Grant’s abilities?

7. Describe the strange story of the Liberal Republicans and Horace Greeley. Why did Democratic support of Greeley seem strange? What six sins did regular Republicans accuse Greeley of?

8. What caused the Panic of 1873? What is the difference between “hard-money” and “cheap-money” supporters and what they wanted (include a discussion of the Resumption Act)?

9. What was the “Crime of ‘73” and how did the amount of silver in circulation influence it? Why did debtors want the government to encourage inflation, and how exactly was that to be done?

10. What was the political fallout regarding all this struggle over currency and monetary policy?

11. Why were elections so close during the “Gilded Age?” What were the real differences between Republicans and Democrats?

12. What on Earth are “Half-Breeds,” “Stalwarts,” and “Mugwumps?”

13. Why was Ohio so politically important? What role did it play in each of the elections in this chapter?

14. Why was the election of 1876 thrown into turmoil? How was this resolved?

15.List the specific benefits the South received as a result of the election of 1876. What were the long-term consequences of the election of 1876 and the Compromise of 1877?

16. How exactly were former slaves (and poor whites) virtually enslaved after the end of Reconstruction?

17. What caused the great railroad strike of 1877? How was this settled? Which side did the federal government take? Why could workers not unify to demand better treatment and wages?

18. Why was the Chinese Exclusionary Act passed? What is the difference between jus soli and jus sanguinis?

19. What role did patronage play in the second assassination of a US president? What reform was passed in the wake of this assassination, and what did it do?

20. Why was the presidential campaign of 1884 one of the dirtiest ever? What were the accusations hurled on both sides?

21. How did the Civil War influence politics throughout the last half of the 19th century?

22. Where did the “Billion Dollar Congress” get all of its money, and why was it determined to spend it all? (Consider the previous question as well).

23. What did the Populists want? Where were they strongest? Why did Southern blacks end up losing as the Populists became more powerful?

24. How did Cleveland end up being elected again in 1892 after losing in 1888?

25. How bad was the Depression of 1893? Why did currency issues crop up again? How was the crisis averted? Why is this so ironic, given what has happened in the US in 2008-2009)?

26. Who are the “Forgettable presidents” and why are they called that?

27. Did this era deserve the name “Gilded Age?” Explain.

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The 14th Amendment, the Debt Ceiling,and the Trillion Dollar Coin all walk into a bar….

Yes, it DOES sound like a joke, but it’s not.
As you know, we just got finished with a standoff over the Congressionally-created crisis known as the “financial cliff,” and now, we have to deal with the impending need to raise the debt ceiling in a few weeks. There have been two particularly interesting ideas put forth to allow President Obama to bypass Congress: The 14th Amendment and a trillion (yes!) dollar coin. We discussed this in class today, but here are the links for you to peruse.

So here’s a link to the discussion on the use of the 14th Amendment to unilaterally allow the president to raise the debt ceiling: http://www.boston.com/news/politics/articles/2011/07/31/possible_legal_loophole_would_be_risky_for_obama/

and here: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/25/us/politics/25legal.html?_r=0

Then there’s the discussion of the Trillion Dollar platinum coin:
http://money.cnn.com/2013/01/09/news/economy/platinum-coin-debt-ceiling/

This has been suggested by people such as President Clinton and Paul Krugman, who is the owner of a Nobel Prize in economics (as well as being a liberal columnist)’ Here’s Krugman’s take: http://krugman.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/01/07/be-ready-to-mint-that-coin/

All this, instead of just negotiating a compromise. Sigh.

US Citizenship Test

Give yourself the test! Click here: http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/2011/0104/Could-you-pass-a-US-citizenship-test/Who-signs-bills?cmpid=prc:ctzn:d

DBQ pictures- clean version

If you have lost your copy of the DBQ packet, a .pdf file can be found here:

Reconstruction DBQ

Document I is difficult to read. Below is a cleaner version:

I have found the other picture, but I can’t get to the menu now here at the school, so check back here after I get home and I will put it right here.

"The First Vote"

“The First Vote”

The Posse Comitatus Act of 1878

In the wake of the end of Reconstruction in 1877, federal law was enacted to make illegal using federal active duty troops as enforcers of laws on American soil except in emergency circumstances– in other words, to make sure nothing like the Military reconstruction of the South could ever happen again. Thus, to this day, domestic military policy is governed by the Posse Comitatus Act. Read here (http://civilliberty.about.com/od/waronterror/a/posse_act.htm) for a summary of the law and its consequences.

Interestingly, there has recently been some discussion that the law needs to be changed particularly in light of the creation of the Department of Homeland Security in the wake of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. This law is the reason why the National Guard, rather than the regular military, is used after national disasters, and, in a limited manner, along our nation’s borders. But the law has its roots in Southern resentment of the use of federal troops to enforce the laws regarding the treatment of freedmen during and after the Civil War.

Links to article from this week’s discussion on citizenship

Maryland Heights woman tries to prove her US citizenship: http://www.stltoday.com/news/local/metro/woman-fights-to-prove-she-s-a-u-s-citizen/article_beba66e5-a28d-5691-88a7-bc1c16ad66af.html

Legal definition of Jus soli: http://definitions.uslegal.com/j/jus-soli/

Legal definition of Jus sanguinis: http://definitions.uslegal.com/j/jus-sanguinis/

Here’s a story of widowed spouses facing deportation: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/30056223/ns/us_news-life/t/widowed-immigrants-fight-deportation/

Some politicians have called for the 14th Amendment to be revised:
http://www.postandcourier.com/news/2010/aug/08/14th-amendment-revision-push-stalls/

The historiography surrounding the Civil War

Excellent article from TIME magazine which explains how historians’ views on the Civil War have changed. Especially highlights early biased interpretations:

http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,2063869,00.html